Florida Institute of Technology

HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN INSTITUTE

Past Events

SEP 10, 2015: Niranjan Suri, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition

Mon Nov 9, 2015 - Thu Aug 4, 2016

Overview of Distributed Intelligent Systems Research

Abstract. Wireless networks and in particular tactical networks (such as those used during disaster recovery and military operations) present many challenges in terms of connectivity, capacity, reliability, and latency. This talk will provide an overview of research in the areas of Agile Computing, Adaptive and Dynamic Systems, Information Management, Information Dissemination, and Coordination mechanisms that were specifically designed for this challenging environment. Topics covered will include transport and dissemination protocols, peer-to-peer protocols, concepts of value of information, and a novel coordination model for distributed unmanned platforms such as ground robots and aerial vehicles.

Speaker's Bio. Niranjan Suri is a Senior Research Scientist at the Florida Institute of Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) and a Visiting Scientist at the US Army Research Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Lancaster University, England, and his M.Sc. and B.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL. Niranjan's current research activity is focused on the notion of Agile Computing - which supports the opportunistic discovery and exploitation of resources in highly dynamic networked environments. He also works on Process Integrated Mechanisms - a novel approach to coordinating the behavior of multiple robotic, satellite, and human platforms. Niranjan's other research interests include the convergence of intelligent systems and distributed systems, networking, communications protocols, virtual machines, energy-aware computing, and software agents. He has been a principal investigator of numerous research projects sponsored by the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL), the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). He has authored or co-authored over 150 papers, has been on the technical program committees of several international conferences, and has been a reviewer for NSF as well as several international journals.

SEP 17, 2015: Stephane Chatty, French Civil Aviation University (ENAC)

Mon Nov 9, 2015 - Thu Aug 4, 2016

Designing human-machine systems, a challenge for engineers

Abstract. A civil engineer who builds a bridge feels responsible for making sure that the bridge will not collapse, but also that it will not create a landslide. In contrast, aerospace engineers often feel responsible only for making sure that their automated systems will not crash. Human errors are someone else's responsibility: pilots, controllers, human factors folks, managers, regulators. Everybody seems to accept that there is no way that the whole human-machine system can be designed as a complete system, using a unified scientific body of knowledge. I will show how we at ENAC are trying to change this by combining our works on aeronautical user interface design, on software tools for engineers, and on theoretical models of interactive software. Our goal is to provide engineers with tools that give them a better grasp on complex systems, including hybrid human-machine systems. In addition to working on a general theory of interactive systems, this leads us to considering a new category of users in addition to pilots and air traffic controllers: engineers themselves. Consequently, my talk will be illustrated with some innovative designs for cockpit and air traffic control workstations, but also with theories and tools aimed at making life easier for engineers when designing, building and validating whole human-machine systems.

Speaker. After a PhD on animated user interfaces in 1992, Stéphane Chatty created a research group in HCI at the French research center on air traffic control (CENA). Aiming at improving the efficiency and safety of user interfaces, his group engaged in pioneering work on the applications of touch screens, gesture recognition and animated user interfaces and became a leader in the design of air traffic control workstations, with several innovations now operational around the world. In 2001 Stéphane created IntuiLab, a company that created innovative user interfaces for customers from the aerospace, defense, automotive and telecommunications industries, filed various patents on engineering methods for interactive software and now markets a solution for creating interactive displays without coding. Since 2007, while remaining IntuiLab's scientific advisor, Stéphane is the head of the Interactive Computing laboratory at ENAC, the French civil aviation university, where he carries out research on a new programming paradigm for interactive software and on theories to support the design of hybrid human-machine systems by engineers.

OCT 13 Kimberly Stowers University of Central Florida

Mon Nov 9, 2015 - Thu Aug 4, 2016

Communication Between Human Factors Psychologists and Engineers: Challenges and Solutions

Abstract. Interdisciplinary teams involving human factors psychologists and engineers often have to work together to win the never-ending race to technological perfection. Human factors psychologists and engineers may work on a variety of problems, including the creation of intelligent agents, interfaces, and performance standards. Many of these problems may involve safety-critical aspects, making it imperative for human factors psychologists and engineers to succeed in their joint efforts to attain high technological safety and performance. However, communication issues often impede this process. The primary purpose of this presentation is thus to explore problems that may arise in communication between these two types of functionally diverse professionals – human factors psychologists and engineers – and pose possible solutions that may aid in their communication. A secondary goal of this presentation is to advocate for more research into communication between human factors psychologists and engineers in order to identify problems and create solutions that can help these teams work more effectively.

Biography. Kimberly Stowers is an instructor of record and doctoral student in the Applied Experimental and Human Factors program at the University of Central Florida (UCF). She received her Master of Science in Modeling & Simulation and her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. She currently conducts research with Dr. Peter Hancock examining trust in human-robot interaction and other topics in human factors. She also works at the Institute of Simulation and Training and the Simulation and Training Technology Center under the direction of Dr. Jessie Chen, conducting research alongside engineers to examine transparency in human-robot interaction for the Army Research Laboratory.

Kimberly previously spent two years at UCF working under the directions of Dr. Eduardo Salas and Dr. Shawn Burke on topics in human factors and industrial/organizational psychology. She has extensive experience researching human-machine systems, human performance measurement, human-centered design, safety analysis, distributed teams, multi-team systems, and team training. During her time at UCF, Kimberly has assisted in research with multiple organizations - including NASA, ARL, AFRL, and NSF. Her primary interests lie in the research of human-machine systems, including the measurement of inputs and processes in such systems.

OCT 15, 2015: Pedro Ferreira University of Lisbon, Portugal

Mon Nov 9, 2015 - Thu Aug 4, 2016

From risk analysis to sustained adaptability

Abstract. High system complexity and fast pace changing environments seem to be inescapable features in every industrial sector, mainly within what has been often described as safety critical systems and critical infrastructures. System interdependencies are becoming increasingly tight and operations are evermore uncertain and unpredictable. Technology today provides the means to transpose all kinds of boundaries, often in a matter of seconds and worldwide. The paths through which people, goods and information are carried across every such boundary are the same through which risks are also propagated. In particular, information and communication technologies over decision making processes have produced risk related impacts that are yet to be fully understood.

Within the various domains of risk management, as the high impacts of both natural and man-made disasters become a growing concern, conventional methods, namely probabilistic and hindsight based assessment tools, have often demonstrated important shortfalls. At the core of such shortfalls is the fact that within complex and safety critical systems, while their operations becomes increasingly variable and uncertain, any failures tend to rapidly cascade into catastrophic results that could compromise the survival of the system itself.

The concept of resilience is currently widely used and proposed as a shift in paradigm towards responding to the high complexity and interdependency of sociotechnical systems. Yet this is often used under oversimplified approaches, mainly as leverage to re-launch previously existing arguments and views, and under a merely renewed terminology. A substantial part of the work published fails to effectively address acting on and managing resilience, even if it contributes to some features potentially relevant for resilience. The fundamental principles and the full extent of their implications are often ignored.

The definitions of resilience are as diverse as the domains within which it has known some kind of application. Despite this diversity, it is more or less unanimously accepted that resilience relates to adaptability capacities in the face of ever-changing operational pressures. Resilience is also described as a property that may or may not emerge from how a system as whole operates, as opposed to a quality that can be deducted from bringing together certain operational and management features. Resilience is essentially the emerging outcome of the interdependencies that are generated through systems operations.

Empirical evidence has led to the validation of concepts and highlighted a set of system features as resilience contributing factors. Nevertheless substantial efforts are still needed in the pursuit of methods and metrics that are truly meaningful to systems resilience and that effectively contribute to a better understanding of dynamics in complex and safety critical systems. Enhancing system resilience relies on understanding how and what adaptability capacities are needed, how these must be integrated and synchronised throughout system interdependencies, and how these may relate to overall system performance. It is often observed that many safety critical systems already possess and foster relevant adaptability capacities but these tend to be managed with complete disregard for the continuous operational changes in the system. A resilience methodology that effectively addresses the far reaching implications of the concept at all levels of systems operation and management is needed. Already exiting literature supports the definition of fundamental methodological principles.

Speaker. Pedro holds a PhD in “Manufacturing Engineering and Operations Management” by the University of Nottingham. His thesis (Resilience in rail engineering planning) addressed human factors, efficiency and safety issues, as well as the impacts of complexity within the planning and delivery of rail engineering work based on a resilience framework.

He has over 10 years of experience, both as a researcher and a consultant in the field of human factors and ergonomics, and over 5 years in the field of occupational health and safety at work and safety management. He has lectured several courses on these subjects within academia, and has worked as a vocational trainer with both private and public institutions.

He developed projects on a wide variety of industrial sectors, starting in the automotive industry during earlier years and more recently, within the rail, road and aviation industries. Particularly in the railways, he worked for 3 years at Network Rail in London, UK and more recently, he cooperated with the Portuguese Government as an advisor on rail issues for the Secretary of State for Transport. He is currently an invited associate professor at the Department of Aeronautics and Transport of the Lusófona University (ULHT). His research focuses mainly in resilience related domains under European Union funded projects, and he lectures on various safety related courses and operations management.

OCT 20, 2015: Jennifer Narkevicius, Jenius LLC

Mon Nov 9, 2015 - Thu Aug 4, 2016

First Principles in the Analysis of Human-System Dynamics

Abstract. Humans drive more than half of the life cycle cost of large complex systems such as national infrastructure and defense systems. Using model-based approaches to analyze requirements, develop designs, prototype systems, and to test and evaluate new systems is essential to ensuring the people are included. The emergent properties of large complex systems, including so-called cyber-physical systems, will NOT behave according to established physical laws. Rather, such systems will behave in accordance with the dynamical properties of cognitive networks – properties that are largely unknown or uncontrolled. A comprehensive effort utilizing simulation of the emerging system design is essential to predict the impact of engineering solutions on system behavior including unknown or unforecasted dynamical regimes. These observations are examples of the kinds of insights that may arise from research in the fundamentals of human-system integration; particularly with respect to cognitive/decision-making systems. We will discuss the inherent complexity of even simple systems and their potential impact on the systems engineering community and efforts to develop and apply MBSE to any large-scale system acquisition enterprise.

Originally presented as an INCOSE webinar. 21 August 2013.

Speaker. Dr. Narkevicius is CEO of Jenius LLC, a woman-owned, veteran-owned small business specializing in Systems Engineering, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Human Factors Engineering (HFE). She brings diverse training, education and experience to complex programs. She has worked across system development from research to requirements definition, system design and development and test and evaluation. She has also worked across HSI Domains and system implementation providing training development and delivery as well as manpower and personnel definition across sectors from high performance military aviation; civil aviation; rail and road ground transportation; as well as distributed networked social and work interactions, supported decision making, and design of web-based enterprise applications. Previously, she served as an officer in the U.S. Navy. Dr. Narkevicius is a member of INCOSE, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Ergonomics Society, and Women in Defense. She holds a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Florida, with master’s degrees in Systems Engineering, Adult Development Psychology, and Special Education – Gifted.

But there is more to life - Jen teaches and performs as a professional harper. She is also a music tour guide sharing Scotland’s music in situ. She merges human factors and music to teach workshops and private lessons to help musicians leverage the strengths of their bodies and minds to improve their performance on and off stage. She is Co-Director of Harp Camp and was the 2012 Up and Coming Tutor at the prestigious Ohio Scottish Arts School. Jen is President, Competition Chair, and a credentialed judge of the Scottish Harp Society of America. Currently certifying as a Certified Music Practitioner she has been privileged to play for Walter Reed Army Hospital, Royal Air Force Kinloss Officers Club, and in Ballindalloch and Delgatie Castle. She blogs weekly on topics that range from touring Scotland with a harp to fulfilling your harper promise on jenthehaper.blogspot.com.

OCT 27, 2015: Edwige Quillerou-Grivot, French Safety Research Institute

Mon Nov 9, 2015 - Thu Aug 4, 2016

The activity clinic approach to help designers when designing production system, a contribution by an occupational psychologist with an engineer

Abstract. We would like to present an interdisciplinary approach between the engineering and human sciences to improve the design of work situations, as much in terms of work quality as in those of workers’ health. To do this, we present feedback from experience of an intervention at an automobile equipment supplier in which an engineer and an occupational psychologist analysed the activity of assembly line workers and the activity of designers to improve their design practices: the future product design and the future assembly line. This research-intervention from a dual standpoint provides designers with a vision of the real work done by the workers, thus aiding them to design future production resources that take better account of their operators' competencies, ways of doing, health, etc. The presentation focuses on this intervention in industry. The aim is to expose the contributions made by the clinic activity methodology implemented in occupational psychology with engineer methods. In conclusion, theoretical and epistemological framework may be explained to change practices design in French companies.

OCT 29, 2015: Jean-Jacques Speyer, ex-Airbus and Free University of Brussels, Belgium

Mon Nov 9, 2015 - Thu Aug 4, 2016

From Flight Test Evaluation to Flight Operations Monitoring onto Further Creative Strides: balancing achievements & pitfalls

Abstract. For the past three decades, civil aviation has been through an era of unprecedented development mostly due to a dramatic surge of air travel worldwide. This was tantamount to a sharp increase in flight safety, with accident rates below 0.25.10-6 per million departures. But this was also the result of dedicated thinking related to all facets of flight path control, the science of navigation, communications, systems handling, let alone CRM.

This evolution will be reviewed by means of a battery of engineering experiments, rapid prototyping and flight tests. In parallel a whole new culture evolved complementing reactive safety with proactive, yet predictive ways to take charge of return of experience pointing to risk areas and safety issues: runway incursions and excursions, controlled flight into terrain, loss of control, mid-air collisions, yet emerging issues like smoke and fumes, battery problems yet pilot training and competency.

Pilots under stress or lacking manual handling can take wrong decisions not being helped any longer by their well-trained routines. Whether this is a generational issue or due to lack of practice, new training methods and tools are needed to face an even wider spectrum of emerging issues that ask for resilience.

All of this is also pointing to an irreversible need for even more technology and automation (Flat/Curved Panels airport maps, VNAV, Dual HUD’s, Tunnel in the Sky…), ATM (Next Gen/SESAR), CDTI (ADS-B), Auto pull-ups, Runway Overrun Protection Systems to name a few. A conundrum there to stay?

Speaker. JJ Speyer is Professor “Aircraft Specification and Certification” at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Université Libre de Bruxelles), Belgium, where he studied. He also graduated from MIT in Aero & Astro.

After a flying period as B707 Flight Engineer, he moved on to Airbus Flight Test where he was instrumental in the first wide-body certification for a crew of two, introducing Human Factors work at Airbus. Besides Human performance, his work led him to Aircraft Performance, focusing on Fuel & Flight Efficiency. He retired as a Senior Director Airline Consulting at the end of 2009. He is married and the father of two children. Author of several position papers, he got the Wright Brothers Award from SAe and the Grand Prix of the French Air et de Space Academy.

OCT 1 Dr. Jennifer Narkevicius, Jenius LLC

Tue Oct 1, 2013

First Principles in the Analysis of Human-System Dynamics

Abstract. Humans drive more than half of the life cycle cost of large complex systems such as national infrastructure and defense systems. Using model-based approaches to analyze requirements, develop designs, prototype systems, and to test and evaluate new systems is essential to ensuring the people are included. The emergent properties of large complex systems, including so-called cyber-physical systems, will NOT behave according to established physical laws. Rather, such systems will behave in accordance with the dynamical properties of cognitive networks – properties that are largely unknown or uncontrolled. A comprehensive effort utilizing simulation of the emerging system design is essential to predict the impact of engineering solutions on system behavior including unknown or unforecasted dynamical regimes. These observations are examples of the kinds of insights that may arise from research in the fundamentals of human-system integration; particularly with respect to cognitive/decision-making systems. We will discuss the inherent complexity of even simple systems and their potential impact on the systems engineering community and efforts to develop and apply MBSE to any large-scale system acquisition enterprise.

Originally presented as an INCOSE webinar. 21 August 2013.

Speaker. Dr. Narkevicius is CEO of Jenius LLC, a woman-owned, veteran-owned small business specializing in Systems Engineering, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Human Factors Engineering (HFE). She brings diverse training, education and experience to complex programs. She has worked across system development from research to requirements definition, system design and development and test and evaluation. She has also worked across HSI Domains and system implementation providing training development and delivery as well as manpower and personnel definition across sectors from high performance military aviation; civil aviation; rail and road ground transportation; as well as distributed networked social and work interactions, supported decision making, and design of web-based enterprise applications. Previously, she served as an officer in the U.S. Navy. Dr. Narkevicius is a member of INCOSE, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Ergonomics Society, and Women in Defense. She holds a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Florida, with master’s degrees in Systems Engineering, Adult Development Psychology, and Special Education – Gifted.

But there is more to life - Jen teaches and performs as a professional harper. She is also a music tour guide sharing Scotland’s music in situ. She merges human factors and music to teach workshops and private lessons to help musicians leverage the strengths of their bodies and minds to improve their performance on and off stage. She is Co-Director of Harp Camp and was the 2012 Up and Coming Tutor at the prestigious Ohio Scottish Arts School. Jen is President, Competition Chair, and a credentialed judge of the Scottish Harp Society of America. Currently certifying as a Certified Music Practitioner she has been privileged to play for Walter Reed Army Hospital, Royal Air Force Kinloss Officers Club, and in Ballindalloch and Delgatie Castle. She blogs weekly on topics that range from touring Scotland with a harp to fulfilling your harper promise on jenthehaper.blogspot.com.

 

APR 4 Jennifer McGovern Narkevicius, PhD Jenius LLC

Thu Apr 4, 2013

 

Acknowledging the Whole System from Design Inception

Abstract. The stark reality is that a system can perform precisely as designed and still fail. Systems cannot continue to be defined as hardware and software that people use. Rather, continued development of intelligent and ubiquitous systems requires that system design start with the goals of the integrated system (as defined by the people in the system) and proceed through the actualization of those goals by the resulting technical entity that develops. From railroads to power grids, operating rooms to the Superbowl, what is a system and how does its design impact its eventual performance in operational use in the real world?

Speaker. Dr. Narkevicius is CEO of Jenius LLC, a woman-owned, veteran-owned small business specializing in Systems Engineering, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Human Factors Engineering (HFE). She brings diverse training, education and experience to complex programs. She has worked across system development from research to requirements definition, system design and development and test and evaluation. She has also worked across HSI Domains and system implementation providing training development and delivery as well as manpower and personnel definition across sectors from high performance military aviation; civil aviation; rail and road ground transportation; as well as distributed networked social and work interactions, supported decision making, and design of web-based enterprise applications. Previously, she served as an officer in the U.S. Navy. Dr. Narkevicius is a member of INCOSE, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Ergonomics Society, and Women in Defense. She holds a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Florida, with master’s degrees in Systems Engineering, Adult Development Psychology, and Special Education – Gifted.

But there is more to life - Jen teaches and performs as a professional harper. She is also a music tour guide sharing Scotland’s music in situ. She merges human factors and music to teach workshops and private lessons to help musicians leverage the strengths of their bodies and minds to improve their performance on and off stage. She is Co-Director of Harp Camp and was the 2012 Up and Coming Tutor at the prestigious Ohio Scottish Arts School. Jen is President, Competition Chair, and a credentialed judge of the Scottish Harp Society of America. Currently certifying as a Certified Music Practitioner she has been privileged to play for Walter Reed Army Hospital, Royal Air Force Kinloss Officers Club, and in Ballindalloch and Delgatie Castle. She blogs weekly on topics that range from touring Scotland with a harp to fulfilling your harper promise on jenthehaper.blogspot.com.

 

APR 1 Dave Prewitt, President, DPC, LLC

Mon Apr 1, 2013

Safety Management in Aviation

Dave discussed developments in Airline and Aviation safety, with a focus on employee reporting and safety oversight.

Speaker. Dave Prewitt is President of Dave Prewitt Consulting, LLC in Melbourne, Florida specializing in safety management system development, improving safety culture, auditing and accident investigation. Dave served as Vice-President Flight Opera-tions at AAR Airlift in Palm Bay, Florida. AAR operates both fixed and rotary wing aircraft on contract around the world.

Dave was named Chief Operating Officer for Rotorcraft Leasing Company, LLC, 9 March 2009. He was responsible for all aspects of the company’s safety, flight, ground, maintenance, and supply chain programs in support of oil and gas operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Rotorcraft operated 125 helicopters over seven states and is the largest privately held Helicopter Com-pany in the world. Before joining Rotorcraft, Dave was Managing Director, Air Safety and Regulatory Compliance at FedEx Express in Memphis. He managed the flight, ground and maintenance safety programs along with Emergency Response Planning for FedEx’s worldwide aviation operations.

Dave was Alaska Airline’s Vice-President for safety in beginning in May 2000. Security was added to his division in the third quarter of 2004 making him responsible for all aspects of the airline’s safety and security programs. Prior to joining Alaska, Dave was Staff Vice President of corporate safety and security at TWA. He oversaw all safety and security activities at TWA’s domestic and international stations and developed an internal audit system for TWA operating departments, including: flight operations, maintenance, inflight and airport operations. He was also involved in the Flight Operations Quality Assurance program with the FAA and TWA management and developed TWA’s accident and incident reporting system, safety infor-mation system and database. Dave joined TWA in 1995 after 28 years in the U.S. Army – He retired as a CW5. He was pro-moted to director of operational safety in at TWA in 1996; became acting director of flight operations safety in 1997 and was promoted to staff vice president of corporate safety and security that same year. Dave is also a pilot and has flown both heli-copters and fixed wing aircraft. He was an Instrument Flight Examiner and Instructor Pilot in both rotary and fixed wing air-craft. In addition to his other duties at TWA he was a first officer on DC-9 aircraft.

Dave served as a founding member on the Board of Directors for the Medallion foundation in 2002 where he remains a Board member and is a past Chairman of the Global Aviation Information Network (GAIN). He also served as the first Industry Co-Chair of the FAA’s Safety Management System Focus Group. Dave was Operations Team Lead on the FAA’s recent SMS ARC. Dave holds a MS in Education from Troy State University and his BS in Aviation Management from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. He serves as the lead instructor at the USC School of Engineering where he teaches SMS. He holds current ATP, CFI, and Ground Instructor Certificates.

MAR 28 Robert L Wears, MD, MS, PhD, University of Florida

Thu Mar 28, 2013 - Fri Mar 29, 2013

Healthcare -- the Ultimate Life-Critical (and Safety-Critical) System

Abstract. Healthcare seems by definition to be the epitome of a life-critical system, so it seems ironic that safety engineering approaches have yet to be taken in such a large industry (>15% of US gross domestic product), despite its association with large volumes of potentially preventable morbidity and mortality. This session will introduce participants to life-critical issues in healthcare, and contrast the safey issues in an organic system (such as healthcare) with those in engineered safety-critical systems. This has implications both for healthcare, and for conceptions of safety-critical industries.

Speaker. Dr Wears attended Johns Hopkins University for his undergraduate and medical education. His postgraduate training was done at University of Texas – San Antonio, the US Public Health Service, and University Hospital of Jacksonville. He practiced emergency medicine in Jacksonville, FL for about six years before joining the University of Florida faculty. After joining the UF faculty, he obtained a Master’s in computer science to be better equipped for work in systems analysis and improvement using computer technology, and directed the development and implementation of the Florida Poison Control Centers data network. His further training includes a 1 year research sabbatical focused on human factors engineering methods at Imperial College London. Subsequent to that, he obtained his PhD in resilience engineering from Mines ParisTech (Centre de recherché sur les Risques et les Crises, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Paris).

He is currently Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida, and Visiting Professor with the Clinical Safety Research Unit at Imperial College of London. He serves on the editorial board and as the methods and statistics editor for Annals of Emergency Medicine; he is also on the editorial board of Human Factors and Ergonomics, the Journal of Patient Safety, and the International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine.

Dr Wears has been an active writer, researcher, and advocate for patient safety since 1995. He has served on several national task forces on patient safety and chaired one. His research interests include the following areas:

  • Human cognitive performance in real-world working conditions
  • Engineering resilience into work systems
  • Teamwork and microsystem culture
  • Organizational behavior and the influence of high level regulatory, economic and social factors on safety.
  • Impact of information technology and the work environment on safety and quality in health care organizations

Dr Wears has authored of numerous publications on biostatistics, human-computer interaction, and patient safety. His research has been funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Patient Safety Foundation, the Emergency Medicine Foundation, and the Army Research Laboratory.

MAR 21 Prof. Anabela Simoes, ISG (Business and Economics School, Portugal)

Thu Mar 21, 2013

Aging: an increasing dimension of Life Critical Systems

Abstract. As much as a system is complex and safety critical the more human operators’ skills and abilities are important for the system efficiency and safety. Actually, human operators represent the most flexible, adaptable and valuable elements of any system as they are adaptive, learning with experience, responsible, collaborative, tool creating/wielding agents creating success under resource and performance pressure at all levels of the system by learning and adapting to the situations and multiple task goals. However, they are also the most vulnerable elements of a system as a consequence of human variability and instability, as well as human behavior, which together with some external factors and organizational constraints can influence the operators’ performance.

Furthermore, the length of active life (more than 30 years) means that human operators will age and some abilities will decline although they can stay competent using their experience on the task and context. Aiming at understanding aging and its impacts on tasks performance within LCS, this lecture will therefore cover the following topics: Demographic trends, Ageing and functional abilities, Human variability, Ageing and task performance, Ageing in the technology era, Aging and systems automation, Working life within LCS and Final remarks.

Keywords. Aging, Demographic trends, Human variability, Compensatory behavior, Technology era, Automation, Human-machine interaction, Human-machine cooperation

Speaker. Prof. Anabela Simoes – ISG (Business and Economics School). PhD in Ergonomics. Full Professor at the Business and Economics School (ISG) in Lisbon. Director of the research center of the Business and Economics School (CIGEST). President of the Portuguese Ergonomics Society from 1997 to 2003. Council member of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA) since 2000. Chair of the IEA Technical Committee on Transport Ergonomics and Human Factors. European Ergonomist since June 1996, by the Center for the Registration of the European Ergonomist (CREE). Member of the HUMANIST NoE (2004-2008). Member of the HUMANIST VCE since 2008. Participation in European research projects since 1991.

 

MAR 14 Dr. Ondrej Doule, HCDi Assistant Professor, FIT

Thu Mar 14, 2013

Extreme Environments

Abstract. Extremely low or high temperatures, unavailable water and power infrastructure, unbreathable, polluted or lower pressure atmosphere and variable gravity are just few possible properties of extreme environments. Negative impacts of extreme environments on human body are extensively studied but in isolation. Until now we do not have comprehensive definition of extreme environment or the levels of “extremeness“ that would be holistic enough to be applicable in terrestrial conditions, aerospace environment as well as on the high seas platforms. Is it possible to find “Extreme“ standard to all environments and would it be worthwhile trying? By identifying characteristic properties of these environments we may further identify risks to human and find risk mitigation strategies and thus also increase human safety. The mitigation strategies often employed in higher extreme environments (where risk is usually identified and mitigated) are then safely transferred to lower extreme environments. Extreme environments of space in sub-orbit, orbit moon or on planetary body such as Mars pose different risks from those on Earth but human well defines technological adaptors to extend its presence in harshness of space and benefits from space lessons learnt also on Earth. So let’s have a look how to safely build a lunar base!

Speaker. Dr. Doule is appointed assistant professor in the Human Centered Design Institute (HCDi) at Florida Institute of Technology. He is also a founder, co-coordinator and designer of a FP7 funded international research project, a Self-deployable Habitat for Extreme Environments architecture demonstrator for space and earth applications. Dr. Doule is a vice-chair of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Space Architecture Technical Committee.

In past he led space architecture research and academic activities and chaired the Space and Society department at the International Space University, Strasbourg, France where he also coordinated number of international and interdisciplinary team project. During his doctoral research he performed his internship at NASA Ames Research Center focusing on Martian Base architecture. His concept design of a suborbital spacecraft interior Silverbird won an Arthur C.Clarke Foundation prize for a unique contribution to a safety of a human spaceflight. Dr. Doule is also active in space architecture outreach. Number of his activities is coordinated through a virtual innovation studio and online design platform called Space Innovations. His research focuses on theory of design, design methods, and architecture with particular focus on extreme environments. Innovative transfer, integration and application of a new space and terrestrial design methods and technologies and integration of space, aerospace and terrestrial domain, to enable faster and more effective project development is a main driver of his research.

He obtained his Ph.D. in Architecture in Extreme Environments from the Czech Technical University Faculty of Architecture in 2010, his M.Sc., Master of Science in Space Management, from the International Space University in 2008, and his M.Arch., Master in Architecture and Urban Planning from the Czech Technical University Faculty of Architecture in 2006.

MAR 7 Lucas Stephane, Research Assistant & PhD Candidate at HCDi

Thu Mar 7, 2013

The Art of Crisis Management - perspectives on industrial accidents

Abstract. While safety approaches for socio-technical systems cover mainly both accident prevention (i.e. prospective, before system boundaries are crossed) and accident analysis (i.e. retrospective, after accidents occur), they somehow leave a gap in between these two stages that corresponds to the accident crisis as-is when-is where-is (i.e. real-time, during the accident). On the other hand, crisis management approaches address higher levels of the local/regional/national/international infrastructures. The current presentation focuses on shared responsibilities of the industrial system manufacturer on one hand and of the industrial system owner and higher organisations on the other hand. The presentation explores current possibilities of tightening the links between these various actors involved in managing the crisis. Furthermore, it addresses multi-level decision-making based on high uncertainty (i.e. complete or partial Station Blackout, reduced means of communication) during the events. Socio-technical safety approaches, crisis management and risk analysis methods are investigated from the perspective of their usefulness and efficiency in such critical situations.

Speaker. At the Human Centered Design Institute/Florida Tech, Lucas Stephane is involved in Cognitive Engineering and more specifically focuses on the integration of Human-Centered Design methods with Information Technologies aiming to improve socio-technical systems' information gathering and sharing within organizations. Lucas Stephane owns a Master of Science in Experimental Psychology and an International Master of Science in Business Intelligence. He has a Certificate of Course Completion in System Safety Engineering delivered by MIT Professor Nancy G. Leveson. He started working as an IT Manager/Analyst and Human Factors Engineer during the late 90s and was involved in the early Java-Corba environment. He continued as a Research Engineer at the European Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Engineering (EURISCO) in France, where he was involved in various projects related to aeronautics, automotive and telecom. Beyond several scientific papers, in 2006 his research in Cognitive Modeling and Eye Tracking was awarded two international patents. Currently he is a Research Assistant and Ph.D. Candidate at the Florida Institute of Technology being involved in the cognitive engineering of instruments and controls dedicated specifically to crisis management in nuclear power plant control rooms.

MAR 5 Dr. Terry Fong, Director, Intelligent Robotics Group NASA Ames Research Center

Tue Mar 5, 2013

Robotics for human exploration

Abstract. Future human missions to the Moon, Mars, and other destinations offer many new opportunities for exploration. But, astronaut time will always be limited and some work will not be feasible for humans to do manually. Robots, however, can complement human explorers, performing work autonomously and under remote supervision from Earth. A central challenge, therefore, is to understand how human and robot activities can be coordinated to maximize mission success and scientific return.

Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks (survey, inspection, routine maintenance, etc.) that are tedious, highly-repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform tasks ahead of crew, such as advance scouting, that help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of crew, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans.

In this talk, I will present some of the ways in which the NASA Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) has been working to improve space exploration. A central focus of our research has been to develop and field test robots that work before, in support, and after humans. Our approach is inspired by lessons learned from the Mars Exploration Rovers, as well as human spaceflight programs, including Apollo, the Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station.

Speaker. Dr. Terry Fong is the Director of the Intelligent Robotics Group at the NASA Ames Research Center. From 2002 to 2004, he was the deputy leader of the Virtual Reality and Active Interfaces Group at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL). From 1997 to 2000, he was Vice President of Development for Fourth Planet, a developer of real-time visualization software. Dr. Fong has published more than a hundred papers in field robotics, human-robot interaction, and robot user interfaces. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University.

MAR 4 Jeffrey Bradshaw, Senior Research Scientist, IHMC

Mon Mar 4, 2013

The Seven Deadly Myths of Autonomy

Abstract. In this talk I will explore some misconceptions surrounding the topic of “autonomous systems.” The immediate catalyst for this essay is a recent US Defense Science Board (DSB) Task Force Report on “The Role of Autonomy in DoD Systems” (DoD). The reference in the title to the “seven deadly myths of ‘autonomous systems’” hearkens back to the “seven deadly sins.” They were so named because of their intrinsic seriousness and because the commission of one of them would engender other acts of wrongdoing. As designers conceive and implement what are commonly (but mistakenly) called “autonomous systems,” they adhere to certain myths of autonomy that are not only damaging in their own right but also, by their continued propagation, because they engender a host of other serious misconceptions and consequences. In this talk I will give reasons why each of these myths should be put to rest once and for all.

Speaker. Jeffrey M. Bradshaw (Ph.D., Cognitive Science, University of Washington) leads the research group developing the KAoS policy and domain services framework for network management and the coordination of human-agent-robot teamwork. His group is collaborating with the NSA-sponsored Federal Digital Policy Management (DPM) Initiative, which has selected the KAoS core ontology as the basis for its future standards efforts. Jeff also co-leads the development of the Luna Software Agent Framework and the Sol Cyber Framework. Jeff has been an Associate Technical Fellow for The Boeing Company; a Fulbright Senior Scholar at the EURISCO in Toulouse, France; a visiting professor at the Institut Cognitique at the University of Bordeaux; is former chair of ACM SIGART; and former chair of the RIACS Science Council for NASA Ames Research Center. He currently serves as a member of the Board on Global Science and Technology for the National Academy of Science and as an external advisory board member of the Cognitive Science and Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories. He is an Honorary Visiting Researcher at the University of Edinburgh, and is a member of the Graduate Faculty at the Florida Institute of Technology.

FEB 28 Kara Schmitt, Research Assistant, FIT HCDi

Thu Feb 28, 2013

Situation Awareness and the Relationship to Functional Allocation

Abstract. This talk will focus on team Situational Awareness and the relationship to functional allocation. Team Situational Awareness plays a significant role in Nuclear Power Plants as the majority of control rooms in the United States have at least three personnel. This talk presents a review of situational awareness in the literature and presents an integrated model based upon multi-domain research and observations - including human spaceflight, automobile, nuclear and aviation control rooms which are then generalized to have applications in any life-critical industry. Situation Awareness is often cited as the most important source of information for decision making in high-stress situations, that is to say that recognizing the context will directly affect the outcome. Though all opinions in a control room contribute to the final decision, in the event of conflicting opinions, a hierarchy of control does exist, and thus we are looking to identify and solidify the link between Team Situational Awareness, Distributed Situational Awareness, and static or dynamic Functional Allocation between the humans, and between the humans and machines.

Speaker. Kara Schmitt is a PhD Candidate at Florida Institute of Technology, working on a dissertation in Function Allocation and Procedure usage in the control room of Nuclear Power Plants. Previously, Ms. Schmitt worked with NASA under United Space Alliance as the lead structural engineer for Space Shuttle Atlantis where she was awarded NASA's Spaceflight Awareness award, as well as the Quest for Excellence Technical Achievement award for her work on the ARES I-X Modal Testing. Miss Schmitt is also currently working on a team developing control algorithms for the Sunjammer Solar Sail Interplanetary Propulsion project. She is a certified Project Management Professional, holds a M.S. in Space Systems, and a B.S. in Physics.

FEB 25 Dr. Paul Krois, Director, Human Factors Division, FAA

Mon Feb 25, 2013

Human Factors Research and Engineering at the FAA

Abstract. Human factors considerations are an enabler of safety and efficiency improvements of the National Airspace System (NAS). Sustaining progress to ensure safety while evolving the NAS toward the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) represents a tremendous challenge for human factors practitioners. It requires careful, disciplined planning with a balanced portfolio, technological innovation, management and operational excellence, and a long-term, integrated perspective. The presentation will provide an overview of human factors research for flight deck and air traffic control (ATC) domains as well as the integration of human factors engineering in acquisitions and engineering of ATC modernization programs and operations.

Speaker. Paul Krois has managed aviation human factors research and acquisition programs since 1988 and joined the Federal Aviation Administration in 1999. As manager of the FAA Human Factors Division in the NextGen Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology Development, he leads the office in planning the portfolio of research addressing the near term flight deck and air traffic control research needs of the FAA as well as advocating effective human system integration with new systems, technologies and procedures comprising the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Paul previously managed the FAA Research Planning Group aligning agency R&D across different lines of business as a corporate portfolio spanning air traffic control, regulation and certification, airports, and energy and environment. He has a doctorate in industrial and organizational psychology from Colorado State University.

Learn more about the FAA Human Factors Division at https://www.hf.faa.gov/hfportalnew/index.aspx

FEB 21 Patrick Millot, University of Valenciennes, France

Fri Feb 22, 2013

Human- machine cooperation:  an answer to Risk Management in Life Critical Systems 

By Prof Dr Patrick M. Millot (*) (**) 

Abstract. We consider human machine dynamic systems where human activities are mainly oriented toward decision-making:  monitoring and fault detection, fault anticipation, diagnosis and prognosis, and fault prevention and recovery. The objectives combine the human-machine system performances (production quantity and quality) as well as the global system safety. In this context human operators may have a double role:

- (1) a negative role as they may perform unsafe or erroneous actions on the process: procedures based on past expertise are common ways to avoid the human “hazardous and uncontrolled” behaviors,  

- (2) a positive role as they can detect, prevent or recover an unexpected event and its unsafe consequences even if that event is due to an inappropriate decision from another operator or from an automated decision maker: Situation Awareness and the ways to maintain it enhances this role.

Two approaches to these questions are combined in a pluridisciplinary research way : (1) human  engineering which aims at designing dedicated assistance tools for human operators and at  integrating them into human activities through a human machine cooperation, (2) cognitive  psychology and ergonomics analyzing the human activities, the need for such tools, their use and their acceptability.

This talk first focuses on parameters related to the human machine interaction and influencing safety: Level of Automation, system complexity, human complexity dealing with normative behavior and erroneous behavior as well. The concept of cooperation is then introduced as an answer and we propose a framework for implementation. Examples in Air Traffic Control, in Telecommunication networks and Nuclear Power Plant illustrate these concepts.

Keywords. Human cognitive modeling, Level of automation, Level of authority, Decision support system, Human-Machine cooperation, Common Frame of Reference, Situation Awareness, Air  Traffic Control, Nuclear power Plant, Telecommunication

Reference. Millot P., Debernard S., Vanderhaegen F., (2011),  Authority and cooperation between humans and machines. In G.Boy (Ed) Handbook for Human-Machine Interaction. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, Wey Court East, Union Road, Farnham, Surrey, GU9 7PT, England  

Speaker. Patrick Millot received a PhD in Automatic Control (1979) and is Docteur d’Etat es Sciences (1987). He is full Professor at the University of Valenciennes (UVHC) since 1989. He conducts research on Automation Sciences, Artificial Intelligence, Supervisory Control, Human-Machine Systems, Human Reliability with applications to production telecommunication and transport systems (Air Traffic Control, Car Traffic, Trains Metro…). His scientific production covers about 195 publications, collective books, conference proceedings. He has been research supervisor of 37 PhD students and 10 HDR since 1989, reviewer of 51 PhD Thesis and 10 HDR from other universities. He was successively head of the research group “Human Machine Systems” in LAMIH (1987-2004, 25 researchers), head of LAMIH (1996-2005, 222 researchers and engineers) and vice President of the University of Valenciennes (2005-2010) in charge of research. He was visiting Professor at Human Centered Design institute (HCDi) headed by PR G. Boy at Florida Institute of Technology (FIT Melboune FL) for one year (August 2011-June 2012). He is currently co-head with G. Boy of the joint research lab on Risk Management in Life Critical Systems between HCDi/FIT and LAMIH-TEMPO/UVHC funded by the French-American Partner University Fund (PUF) for 3 years (2012-2015).

He was member of the scientific board / Manager of several regional research groups on Supervisory Control (GRAISYHM 1996-2002) on Transport (GRRT since 1987) and head of the ST2 program on Transport System Safety (2001-2006, 80 researchers of 10 labs). He was also member of the French Council of the Universities (CNU 1996-2003), member of the scientific board of the French national research group in Automation Sciences supported by CNRS (1996-2001). Partner of several European projects and networks: 2 Human Capital and Mobility networks 1993-1996, 2 projects since 2002 on Urban Guided Transport Management Systems (UGTMS followed by MODURBAN) 1 project on car driver modeling (ITERATE) and the Network of Excellence EURNEX since 2004. He was IPC member of several International Conferences and Journals, member since 2000 and Vice Chairman since 2009 to 2011 of the IFAC (International Federation of Automatic Control) Technical Committee 4.5 Human-Machine Systems.

(*) Laboratoire d'Automatique, de Mécanique et d'Informatique Industrielle et Humaine, LAMIH CNRS -University of Valenciennes -Le Mont Houy, 59313 VALENCIENNES CEDEX 9 -France

(**) Joint Research lab on Risk Management in Life Critical Systems, HCDi/FIT Melbourne FL, LAMIH/Univ Valenciennes,F

e-mail : patrick.millot@univ-valenciennes.fr ; pmillot@fit.edu

FEB 14 Dr. Lane Desborough, Medtronic, California

Thu Feb 14, 2013

A cross-industry perspective on systems engineering for complex, hazardous, software-intensive systems

Drawing on experience in four distinct industries - petrochemicals, oil refining, power generation, and medical devices, this talk will give an overview of the challenges and opportunities of systems engineering, with a focus on implementing safe and effective automation and human factors.

Speaker. Lane Desborough is Product Strategist for the Diabetes division of Medtronic, Inc. in Northridge California. He is focused on the development of therapies such as the artificial pancreas, connected care technology, and clinician decision support, leveraging his experience in oil refinery automation and smart grid system remote monitoring / decision support. Lane is also applying learning from these other domains to reduce the burden of diabetes through the application of technology to benefit patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and society. For example, he recently spent three weeks volunteering in Chennai, India, where he applied his experience in data mining to improve the detection, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of gestational diabetes.

Lane received engineering degrees from the University of Waterloo and Queen’s University. Prior to joining Medtronic in 2010, he spent 18 years working for Nova Chemicals, Honeywell, and General Electric. He lives with his wife and three children in Thousand Oaks, California and enjoys running and sailboat racing.

For more information, please send an email to dcaballe@fit.edu.

* HCDi seminars are open to anyone for free.