Florida Institute of Technology

HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN INSTITUTE

Themes

The Human-Centered Design Institute (HCDi) members are faculty, permanent and visiting research scientists, and graduate students.

Graduate students (PhD and Master's) are typically registered in the PhD Program in HCD and Master's Program in HCD.

We currently have 10 transversal themes (see the list below) and 4 domain themes (Aeronautics, Space, Nuclear and Education).

These graduate programs in HCD are designed to attract students who have the greatest potential for expanding the frontiers of knowledge and art of HCD, and transferring this knowledge and art to others. HCD contributes to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education, and more specifically STEAM where the "A", for Arts, introduces mandatory creativity that HCD fosters. Please read "Motivation".

These programs are open to students with a strong interest in people and who are ready to learn about applied human and social sciences. They require significant breadth and depth of understanding in engineering, mathematics and science; the mastery of several specialized subjects; and the creativity to extend the body of knowledge through significant original research and professional work.

Regarding the PhD program, a candidate should have completed a master’s degree in an engineering discipline, computer science, fundamental science or mathematics and demonstrate a strong interest in human and social science or the arts. Candidates from human and social sciences or the arts who have a strong background in engineering or design may also be eligible. Each candidate is expected to publish major portions of the dissertation in refereed conferences and journals, and is strongly encouraged to actively participate in HCDi research activities while pursuing the degree.  The student’s advisory committee and the director the Human-Centered Design Institute must approve the doctoral program of study.

Regarding the Master's program, a candidate should have completed a bachelor degree in an engineering discipline, computer science, fundamental science or mathematics and demonstrate a strong interest in human and social science or the arts. Candidates from human and social sciences or the arts who have a strong background in engineering or design may also be eligible. Each candidate is expected to either complete a thesis or a professional project. He or she is strongly encouraged to actively participate in HCDi research activities while pursuing the degree.

Ongoing/Current Research

  • Nuclear control room design: cognitive function analysis and allocation, human-centered automation—Areva Grant
  • Nuclear control room design: advanced interaction media, eye tracking experimentations—Areva Grant
  • Multi-source data visualization techniques for the Virtual Camera in planetary exploration—in cooperation with NASA
  • Situation awareness in aircraft cockpits—in cooperation with Craig Technologies
  • Organizational Dynamic Planning and Complexity of Trajectory Based Operations, application to NextGen Air Traffic Management Systems—in cooperation with Boeing
  • Habitat Infrastructures in Extreme Environments: Human-Centered Design of Moon and Mars Habitats
  • What Space can bring to Global STEM Education: Human-Centered Design supporting STEM education—In cooperation with ISU and NNDS
  • Enterprise Systems Maintenance Knowledge Management: Human Systems Integration
  • Intelligent Assistance in the Cockpit: Interactive Procedures and Checklists for Commercial Airplanes

HCDi develops the following transversal themes both in education and research:

Cognitive engineering: human-centered automation, scenario-based design, cognitive modeling, cognitive function analysis, risk taking and management, situational awareness, decision-making, integration and use cases.

Advanced interaction media: input techniques, tangible and haptic interaction, multimodal interaction, ubiquitous computing and information flows, surface computing, information visualization, use experience and usability engineering, ethnographical design, computer-supported cooperative work.

Complexity analysis in HCD: complexity theories, complex systems, systems of systems, adaptive systems, human-centered requirement engineering, socio-cognitive stability, resilience, accident investigation and analysis, traceability, design for simplicity, product and practice maturity.

Life-critical systems: research across domains such as aerospace, nuclear, medicine, ground transportation and eco-systems, design for safety, design for efficiency, design for comfort.

Human-centered organization design and management: knowledge management, resilience engineering, certification, product integration, complexity research, organizational automation, computer-supported meeting environments.

Modeling and simulation:computer-aided design, life-cycled product management, discrete-event simulations, multi-agent simulations, mathematical models for simulation, human-in-the-loop simulations.

Function analysis: Task, activity and work analyses, cognitive function emergence and discovery, function allocation, operational procedures and automation.

Usability engineering: Sensorimotor, cognitive and social models and measures, ergonomic guidelines, emotional stress, fatigue, workload, pleasure, conceptual models.

Creativity and design thinking: Problem-solving using out-of-the-box approaches, concept thinking, storyboarding, parallel thinking, participatory design, inspiration and innovation.

Industrial design: HCD of life-critical systems including industrial and everyday-life products such as cockpits, control room, emergency centers, interior design and architecture.

For more information, please send an email to dcaballe@fit.edu.